rac

RAC’s melody-driven indie-electronica on his forthcoming third album 'BOY' washes over you like faint memories. The songs are soft, light, warm, and comforting, as though revisiting old photo albums and recalling years gone by without any of the day-to-day struggles. It's at peace with the past, while lodged in the present. Anjos had an unusual upbringing. He was raised overseas to parents who both worked as missionaries. His mother is American, and he always felt torn between worlds in terms of nationality, first language, even the concept of home itself. “I didn't feel a part of any specific world, it was a bit alienating,” he recalls. 'BOY' pulls from these nascent years; ones in which words weren't doing the talking, but more esoteric languages – little melodic phrases that would be stuck in his head, or plain pangs of the heart. Back in his youth, Anjos had to do it all from scratch with no knowledge of how to create. He was his own teacher and guide. In the years since, he's released two LPs, worked on Linkin Park's final album, TV and film soundtracks, scored a ballet and remixed everyone from Lana del Rey to Odesza to Bob Marley. His songs have been streamed over half a billion times, he's won a Grammy and his live performances have taken him to festivals the world over. He feels at ease with his success, and in a place of liberation to do and make as he pleases. The process of 'BOY' has changed him in a way that will guide his next moves. By Eve Barlow